Durian Export

We are experienced International wholesale exporters of durians worldwide with our biggest market in China.

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We are keen to pursue other wholesale export opportunities in other countries.

 

 

Durian information - Our comprehensive Durian Resource

  • Durian cultivars and Types
  • Durian geographic distribution in Malaysia
  • Durian Nutritional Content
  • Uses
  • We aim to provide you with a description of modern Malaysian durians on our website.

    Durian info export


    The Durian is often known as the King of Fruits (because of the spikes that surround its soft edible flesh that are reminiscent of a crown). Durians are fruits that hail from durian trees which take a minimum of 10-15 years to mature. When the fruits are ripe, they fall to the ground, ready for harvest and consumption. However, this is not the case in Thailand where fruits are harvested before this time according to local taste and export. Unfortunately, in Malaysia and other countries, we feel that this impacts on the taste of the fruit. These days, there are nets set up in orchards to catch the falling fruit to avoid damage to the fruit and protect people below as in our Durian Plantation in Johor. Durians are also infamous for their strong pungent smell. Durian lovers will obviously appreciate the scent, as it only adds to the taste. Many are converts after one tasting, and actively seek this fruit out during 'Durian season' in a part of the world where seasonal fruits are rare. Durian trees fruit twice a year, and thus have two 'seasons' - usually in February for 2 months and the main 'season' in September or October for 3 months.

    Durian Cultivars (eg Mao San Wong) can be differentiated by examining the outside of the thorned fruit, by the colour, size of spikes/thorns, shape of the bottom end of the durian (star shaped, rounded), and also the pulp.

    The inside

    The fleshy edible flesh of the fruit that lies within the hard shell has a soft, creamy texture, similar to custard. The taste of this is usually sweet or bitter, or even slightly fermented. The wonder the fruit is often in the texture and taste of the flesh.

    There is often a large seed within the core of the fruit. Some cultures choose to eat this by deep frying it in batter. The empty inside of the shell is often used as a container for water that is drunk for a 'cooling' effect. The Chinese believe that too much durian contains excess 'heat' and the coolness will balance this out.

    The flowers of the Durian trees often make excellent pickles and curries in Malaysia. Often these are easier to harvest than the fruit itself as it takes many years for Durian trees to mature and fruit. It is believed that an older tree yields better fruit, as do the 20-25 year old fruit trees in our Orchard.

    durianfeast

    Bitter-sweet Durians


    In general, there are two main tastes that attract durian lovers. In general, Thai durians are of the sweet variety and Malaysian durians of the bitter-sweet variety. It is a personal preference as too which one is preferred. However, culturally, texture of the fruit is almost as important, and the creamy almost custard-like filling is appreciated in all cultures.

    Selecting Durians

    Durians in general have a shelf life of 1-2 weeks at most once they have fallen off the tree and so have to be consumed very quickly. Hence, fresher durians make better durians. Often durian sellers shake the durian to prove that the fruit is still turgid and holding on to the inside of the shell, as older fruit is believed to cause dehydration of the fruit and one would be able to hear the fruit move inside as the flesh would seperate from the shell. One can also look at the durian stalk - the greener and fresher the stalk, the fresher the durian.

    Types of Durians and the D numbers

    Over the years, many different cultivars have been developed and registered in many Durian producing countries. The most famous current one in vogue is the D197 Mao San Wong durian, and there are others such as the Kim Hong and XO durians.

    Durian Culture

    It is increasingly popular to have Durian parties, as families, friends, and colleagues gather together to have meals based around Durians. Often these are eaten on their own but can be eaten with rice as well, depending on the circumstance and culture.

    Durian Varieties / Cultivars - information from Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI)

    click for larger view D197 (Mao San Wang or Mao San Wong)

    The tree is medum large.It flowers regularly but low in yield making it even more desirable. Each fruit weighs 1.5-2.5 kg, roundish in shape. The skin is yellowish light green in colour. The aril is thick and half of it are small seeds. Each locule contains 1-2 pulp units, medium to large in size. It is orange-yellow in colour with a fine texture,dry and is not too sweet and nutty. It has good keeping quality with a natural shelf life of about 2 days.

     

    click for larger view Kim Hong (Tangkak)

    This is the counterpart of D197. The plant is comparatively small, shady, fruits often, Each fruit weighs 1.5-2.8 kg, roundish in shape. The skin is yellowish light green in colour. The aril is thick and each pulp unit is big and most of them are small seeds. It is orange-yellow in colour with a fine texture,dry and is not too sweet and nutty. It has good keeping quality with a natural shelf life of about 2 days.

     

    click for larger view D13

    The plant is medium large and erect. It flowers regularly with good yielding. The fruits are generally borne on smaller secondary/ tertiary branches. They are medium, oval and kidney-shaped with sharp spines. They are easy to open. The aril (edible portion of the fruit, also known as flesh or pulp) is thick, reddish yellow in colour, firm and sweet in taste. Each locule possesses only a few pulp units often variable in size. The flesh quality is excellent.

     

    click for larger view D101 (Durian Mas)

    The tree is medium large and rather sensitive to dry environments. It fruits less regularly but has an average to high yielding ability. Fruits are borne all over the tree. Each fruit is medium large weighing 1.5-2.5 kg and is round to oval in shape. The fruit splits easily. The skin is medium thick and dark green in colour. Each locule contains 1-4 pulp units arranged in single rows. The aril is medium thick, golden yellow in colour, fine textured, tastes sweet and nutty with a good aroma. The aril quality is good.

     

    http://agromedia.mardi.gov.my/imageupload/F003_pix33-29May2006-174144.jpgD24

    The plant is large, vigorous with a broad pyramid canopy. The trees flower regularly and are high yielding. Each mature tree may bear 100-150 fruits/tree/season. Fruits are borne all over the tree, the lower branches being more productive. Each fruit is medium large and weighs 1.0-1.8 kg/fruit with a round to oval shape. The skin is thick and light green in colour. Each locule contains 1-4 pulp units arranged in single rows. The aril is thick, light yellow in colour, firm with fine texture. It is sweet and nutty with a slight bitter taste. It is extremely susceptible to Phytophthora stem canker. The fruits usually exhibits some degree of uneven fruit ripening (UFR), a physiological disorder associated with durian.


    http://agromedia.mardi.gov.my/imageupload/F003_pix1-29May2006-170844.jpgD2 (Dato' Nina)

    The plant is medium large and erect. It flowers regularly but is low yielding. It shows good tolerance to Phytophthora stem canker. The fruits are generally borne on smaller secondary/ tertiary branches. They are medium to large, oval and kidney-shaped with sharp spines. They are difficult to open. The aril is thick, copper yellow in colour and firm. Each locule possesses only a few pulp units often variable in size. The aril quality is excellent.


    http://agromedia.mardi.gov.my/imageupload/F003_pix2-29May2006-170844.jpgD 10

    The plant is medium in size with a broad canopy. It flowers regularly and is medium to high yielding. The clone is sensitive to Phytophthora stem canker. Fruits are borne uniformly all over the tree. The fruit is round to oval weighing 1.0-1.7 kg each. It has poor keeping quality and tends to split easily. The skin is medium thick and yellowish green in colour. The aril is thick, bright yellow in colour and is sweet and nutty. Each locule is completely filled with pulp units arranged in single rows. The aril quality is good



    http://agromedia.mardi.gov.my/imageupload/F003_pix44-29May2006-174908.jpgD99

    The tree is medium sized, low branching often with a loose canopy. It flowers regularly with a tendency towards biannual fruiting. It has a very high fruit bearing ability up to 100-130 fruits/ tree/ season. The clone is tolerant to Phytophthora stem canker as well as dry environments. It is a good pollinator clone, cross compatible to most other clones. The fruits are borne mainly on the lower branches. Each fruit is small to medium in size weighing 1.0-1.5 kg and is almost round in shape with a slight suppression at the apical end. It is easily split revealing its thin skin. Each locule contains 1-4 pulp units medium to large in size. The aril is thick, bright yellow in colour, fine textured, slightly wet and has a sweet and nutty taste with a good aroma. The clone is an early season dropper.

     

    http://agromedia.mardi.gov.my/imageupload/F003_pix5-29May2006-170902.jpgD145 (Durian Hijau)

    The tree is medium large and rather sensitive to dry environments. It fruits less regularly but has an average to high yielding ability. Fruits are borne all over the tree. Each fruit is medium large weighing 1.3-1.5 kg and is round to oval in shape. The fruit splits easily. The skin is medium thick and dark green in colour. Each locule contains 1-4 pulp units arranged in single rows. The aril is medium thick, bright yellow in colour, fine textured, tastes sweet and nutty with a good aroma. The aril quality is good. It is quite sensitive to Phytophthora stem canker

    Durian distribution in Malaysia

    Durian is grown in all parts of Malaysia with the main commercial planting areas being found in Johor, Perak, Pahang, Kedah, Selangor, Kelantan and Melaka.

     

    State

    Hectarage

    Producing Area

    Production

    JOHOR

    39,261.3

    20,323.6

    108,348.7

    KEDAH

    5,246.5

    2,015.3

    10,294.1

    KELANTAN

    20,554.1

    6,869.7

    27,438.3

    MELAKA

    4,120.0

    4,120.0

    32,960.0

    NEGERI SEMBILAN

    3,896.2

    554.8

    2,796.2

    PAHANG

    10,534.4

    5,704.9

    11,020.0

    PERAK

    10,711.3

    4,156.0

    16,334.9

    PERLIS

    98.1

    39.8

    184.8

    PULAU PINANG

    3,891.2

    1,753.7

    7,285.6

    SELANGOR

    4,237.1

    3,549.1

    25,759.0

    TERENGGANU

    6,046.9

    984.8

    1,735.7

    PENINSULAR M'SIA

    108,597.2

    50,071.6

    244,157.3

    SABAH

    3,337.5

    N.A.

    N.A.

    SARAWAK

    10,825.0

    N.A.

    N.A.

    TOTAL

    122,759.7

    50,071.6

    244,157.3

    Source: DOA 2003

    Nutritional Composition of durian fruit

    Nutrient

    Composition per 100 g edible portion

    Energy

    153 kCal

    Moisture

    64.1 g

    Carbohydrate

    27 g

    Fat

    3.4 g

    Protein

    2.7 g

    Fibre

    0.9 g

    Ash

    1.0 g

    Calcium

    40 mg

    Phosphorus

    44 mg

    Iron

    1.9 mg

    Sodium

    40 mg

    Potassium

    70 mg

    Vitamin A

    150 mg

    Vitamin B1

    0.1 mg

    Vitamin B2

    0.13 mg

    Vitamin C

    23.3 mg

    Nutrient content varies to a certain extent between countries (e.g. Malaysia and Thailand) especially in fat, moisture and carbohydrate contents of the fruit indicating the influence of environment on fruit quality. This phenomenon is also observed between locations in a country.

    Durian export display

    Durian uses

    Flesh: Durians are sold whole, or the flesh removed from the fruit and placed in Styrofoam containers in segments, wrapped in clear plastic. The flesh is mostly eaten fresh, often out-of-hand.

    Sometimes durian is simply boiled with sugar or cooked in coconut water, and it is a popular flavouring for ice cream. The Javanese prepare the flesh as a sauce to be served with rice; they also combine the minced flesh with minced onion, salt and diluted vinegar as a kind of relish; and they add half-ripe arils to certain dishes. Arabian residents prefer to mix the flesh with ice and syrup. The Malays also ferment in earthern containers and eat the fermented durian as a relish (tempoyak).
    In Malaysia a popular durian cake, dodol, is made from durian mixed with coconut and palm sugar.

    The seeds are eaten after boiling, drying, and frying or roasting. In Java, the seeds may be sliced thin and cooked with sugar as a confection; or dried and fried in coconut oil with spices for serving as a side-dish.

    Young leaves and shoots are occasionally cooked as greens. Sometimes the ash of the burned rind is added to special cakes.

    In Sri Lanka and parts of India, a durian milkshake - type drink is very popular.

    Processed: Durian flesh is canned in syrup for export in Thailand. It is also dried for local use and export. Blocks of durian paste are sold in the markets. In Bangkok much of the paste is adulterated with pumpkin. Malays preserve the flesh in salt in order to keep it on hand the year around to eat with rice, even though it acquires a very strong and, to outsiders, a most disagreeable odour. The unripe fruit is boiled whole and eaten as a vegetable.

    Non-food uses

    Rind: The dried or half-dried rinds are burned as fuel and fish may be hung in the smoke to acquire a strong flavour. The ash is used to bleach silk.

    durian thorns

    Wood: The sapwood is white, the heartwood light red-brown, soft, coarse, not durable nor termite-resistant. It is used for masts and interiors of huts in rural parts of Malaysia.

    Medicinal Uses: The flesh is said to serve as a vermifuge. Certain Malay communities use a decoction of the leaves and roots as a febrifuge. The leaf juice is applied on the head of a fever patient. The leaves are employed in medicinal baths for people with jaundice. Decoctions of the leaves and fruits are applied to swellings and skin diseases. The ash of the burned rind is taken after childbirth. The leaves probably contain hydroxy-tryptamines and mustard oils.

    The odour of the flesh is believed to be linked to indole compounds which are bacteriostatic. Eating durian is alleged to restore the health of ailing humans and animals. The flesh is widely believed to act as an aphrodisiac. 

    Health warnings

    Our advice is from medical experts and anecdotal from their medical experiences. It is a high calorie food and is unsuitable for regular consumption by diabetics. The starchy and sugary content raises blood sugars in diabetics. Hence, consumption in moderation is advised.


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